Category Archives: Walks

MacMillan Reserve and Tamawhariua Reserve, Katikati

A parking area at the eastern end of Beach Road, Katikati, provides access to MacMillan Reserve to the north, and Tamawhariua Reserve and Coastal Walkway to the south. MacMillan Reserve provides walking and cycling access along the foreshore and then to the eastern end of Pukakura Road. Tamawhariua Reserve runs alongside the foreshore before heading back to Beach Road, ending on Beach Road about 500 metres from the carpark. There are toilets in the carpark, and a boat ramp off the end of Beach Rd.

There appears to be very little information about the reserves, and although the Tamawhariua Reserve is mentioned very briefly in a Western Bay of Plenty District Council page about cycle and walking trails there were no signs on the route indicating it’s name. It is signposted as a public walkway and cycle way and is also open to mobility scooters. Dogs are permitted, but must be kept under control at all times. It appeared to be a popular route for dog walkers. Horses and motorcycles are not allowed.

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Lake Te Koutu, Cambridge

Lake Te Koutu (also shown as Lake Te Koo Utu and Lake Te Ko Utu) in the heart of Cambridge is a natural lake formed during one of the later Taupo volcanic eruptions about 1800 years ago when debris swept down the Waikato River and blocked off many small side streams. Water backup up behind the debris formed what is now Lake Te Koutu. The lake forms part of the 17.6 hectare Cambridge Domain which was established in 1880. Information about the domain and the walks is available on the Cambridge web site and the Mighty Waikato web site.

The Cambridge Domain is located on two main terrace levels, with steep slopes between the lower level which includes the lake, and the upper level where there is direct access from Victoria Street, Thornton Road, and Lake Street. The main access to the lake level is off Albert Street, with a parking area near the lake. There is an elevation difference of about 27 metres between the lake level and the upper level.

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Yarndley’s Bush, Te Awamutu

Yarndley’s Bush is a 14-hectare remnant of native swamp forest dominated by kahikatea, the tallest of native New Zealand trees. The bush remnant is accessible from Ngaroto Road, near Te Awamutu, down a sloping access track to the bush itself. A short loop track through the western end of the bush, mostly formed as a boardwalk to protect the tree roots, has a lookout tower about halfway around the loop. The bush was purchased from Richard Yarndley in 1992 to create a scenic reserve, and the boardwalk and lookout tower were built by the Te Awamutu Kiwanis Club in 1994/1995. Limited information about the bush and the walk can be found on the Waipa District Council web site, and the Te Awamutu information web site.

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Lake Moananui, Tokoroa

Lake Moananui is an artificial lake in Tokoroa, formed in 1975 when a low dam was built across Matarawa Stream. The lake forms part of Lake Moananui Reserve, and a concrete pathway forms a 2.5 km long walkway or cycleway around the lake. The reserve is accessible from Arawa Crescent or from SH32/Maraetai Road. There are parking areas in both locations, and toilets are easily accessible from Arawa Crecent. Some information about the lake and the walk can be found on The Mighty Waikato tourism web site. Continue reading

Otawa trig from Manoeka Road

Otawa Scenic Reserve is an area of native forest south-east of Tauranga and south-west of Te Puke. Otawa trig, at an elevation of 565 metres, is the highest point within the reserve. The trig is accessible from several locations, including a track which starts at the end of Manoeka Road, climbing to meet up with the track from Demeter Road and Otanewainuku, with a short steeper section before reaching the trig station. There are no views from the trig station, or from the track which has vegetation cover for the entire length.

The Otawa Scenic Reserve is managed by DoC, and a short description of the reserve and some of the tracks is found on their web site. An alternative and easier route to the trig station is described in the post Otawa Trig from Te Puke Quarry Road on this site.

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Karakariki Track to Waterfall, Whatawhata

The Karakariki Scenic Reserve was originally set aside as a water conservation reserve. The reserve covers about 486 hectares, and is accessible across private farmland from the end of Karakariki Valley Road, off Karakariki Road which branches off SH23 between Hamilton and Raglan, near Whatawhata. At one time the forest was dominated by kauri but this was milled out in the early 1900s. There is a short, relatively easy, track leading from the end of Karakariki Valley Road to a small waterfall. The track then continues up a steeper hill section, ending at a fenceline but without any views.

The waterfall apparently does not have an official name, despite being shown on Google Maps as Karakariki Waterfall. Karakariki Stream is actually somewhat further to the south. The track to the waterfall and beyond is known as Karakariki Track, with a description and a few photos on the DoC web site. There are several streams joining near the waterfall, including Mangapapa Stream, Tuoro Stream and Whakakai Stream. The first two are presumably the ones crossed on the last swing bridge before the waterfall, with Whakakai Stream appearing on the topographic map to be the waterfall stream. Continue reading

Waiwhakareke Natural Heritage Park, Hamilton

Waiwhakareke Natural Heritage Park is an ecological restoration project situated on the outskirts of Hamilton, attempting to bring back Hamilton’s native flora and fauna. The park is owned and managed by Hamilton City Council, with help from Waikato University, Wintec, Waikato Regional Council and Tui2000. More information about the history, the park, and the project can be found on the Hamilton City Council web site.

One entry to the park is located on Brymer Road, directly across the road from the entrance to Hamilton Zoo. The intention is to create a hub with a common arrival space and facilities. The plantings in the park have been ongoing since 2004, but the park was only open to the public from mid-November 2019. Continue reading

Mangaokewa River Loop Walk, Te Kuiti

Mangaokewa Gorge Scenic Reserve, off SH30 a few minutes south of Te Kuiti, has a campsite and a walkway running through it. The walkway is part of Te Araroa Trail between Te Kuiti and Pureora. Within the reserve the trail runs alongside the Mangaokewa River (or Mangaokewa Stream), and on the other side of the stream there is a walking track through older native forest. A swing bridge at either end allows a walk to be done as a loop, with a nominal time of 1.5 hours. Although DoC owns and manages the reserve there appears to be no information about the loop walk on the DoC web site. However the Te Araroa section can be found on the Te Araroa web site.

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Pā Kererū Loop Walk, Whakamārama

The Pā Kererū Loop Walk was opened in early November 2019 after several years of work by  the Mahi Boys training program, a special team who are all clients of the Bay of Plenty District Health Board mental health service. A story with details and photos can be found on the Bay of Plenty Times web site. The loop walk is located at the end of Whakamarama Road, starting from the same location as the Leyland O’Brien Tramway track and the Ngamarama Track.

The Pā Kererū track mainly follows the old Poripori and Leyland O’Brien tramlines, with very easy gradients and bridges over stream crossings. The walking time is marked as 40 minutes for the loop, starting and ending at the Bulldozer Blade Clearing at the southern end of Whakamarama Road. Continue reading

Rotorua Walkway: Pukeroa, Lakefront, Motutara, Te Arikiroa, Puarenga

Rotorua Walkway is a 26 km long walkway divided into 8 sections forming a loop, with a further two walkways branching off from the main loop. The walkways are described in the brochure Rotorua Walkways available on the Rotorua Lakes Council web site, under the Brochures heading. The two walkways branching off, Mangakakahi and Otamatea, have been covered in a previous post: Mangakakahi and Otamatea walkways, Rotorua and the Utuhina section (number 7 in the brochure) has been covered in the post: Utuhina Walkway, Rotorua

This post describes the sections numbered 1 to 5 in the brochure, as well as part of number 6. These are Pukeroa, Rotorua Lakefront, Motutara, Te Arikiroa and Puarenga, with part of the Rotorua Tree Trust walkway. The walk starts near the intersection of Lake Road and Ranolf Street, across from Kuirau Park. There is no parking area nearby, although parking is available on and near Rangiuru Street, with about a 500 metre walk to the starting point. The Puarenga section walk ends at the entrance to Whakarewarewa Village on Tryon Street. Total distance is about 8.5 km with a walking time of about 2 hours 10 minutes.

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